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Tim
Tim
Last activity on 20 Apr 2024 at 15:07

If you've dabbled in "procedural generation," (algorithmically generating natural features), you may have come across the problem of sphere texturing. How to seamlessly texture a sphere is not immediately obvious. Watch what happens, for example, if you try adding power law noise to an evenly sampled grid of spherical angle coordinates (i.e. a "UV sphere" in Blender-speak):
% Example: how [not] to texture a sphere:
rng(2, 'twister'); % Make what I have here repeatable for you
% Make our radial noise, mapped onto an equal spaced longitude and latitude
% grid.
N = 51;
b = linspace(-1, 1, N).^2;
r = abs(ifft2(exp(6i*rand(N))./(b'+b+1e-5))); % Power law noise
r = rescale(r, 0, 1) + 5;
[lon, lat] = meshgrid(linspace(0, 2*pi, N), linspace(-pi/2, pi/2, N));
[x2, y2, z2] = sph2cart(lon, lat, r);
r2d = @(x)x*180/pi;
% Radial surface texture
subplot(1, 3, 1);
imagesc(r, 'Xdata', r2d(lon(1,:)), 'Ydata', r2d(lat(:, 1)));
xlabel('Longitude (Deg)');
ylabel('Latitude (Deg)');
title('Texture (radial variation)');
% View from z axis
subplot(1, 3, 2);
surf(x2, y2, z2, r);
axis equal
view([0, 90]);
title('Top view');
% Side view
subplot(1, 3, 3);
surf(x2, y2, z2, r);
axis equal
view([-90, 0]);
title('Side view');
The created surface shows "pinching" at the poles due to different radial values mapping to the same location. Furthermore, the noise statistics change based on the density of the sampling on the surface.
How can this be avoided? One standard method is to create a textured volume and sample the volume at points on a sphere. Code for doing this is quite simple:
rng default % Make our noise realization repeatable
% Create our 3D power-law noise
N = 201;
b = linspace(-1, 1, N);
[x3, y3, z3] = meshgrid(b, b, b);
b3 = x3.^2 + y3.^2 + z3.^2;
r = abs(ifftn(ifftshift(exp(6i*randn(size(b3)))./(b3.^1.2 + 1e-6))));
% Modify it - make it more interesting
r = rescale(r);
r = r./(abs(r - 0.5) + .1);
% Sample on a sphere
[x, y, z] = sphere(500);
% Plot
ir = interp3(x3, y3, z3, r, x, y, z, 'linear', 0);
surf(x, y, z, ir);
shading flat
axis equal off
set(gcf, 'color', 'k');
colormap(gray);
The result of evaluating this code is a seamless, textured sphere with no discontinuities at the poles or variation in the spatial statistics of the noise texture:
But what if you want to smooth it or perform some other local texture modification? Smoothing the volume and resampling is not equivalent to smoothing the surficial features shown on the map above.
A more flexible alternative is to treat the samples on the sphere surface as a set of interconnected nodes that are influenced by adjacent values. Using this approach we can start by defining the set of nodes on a sphere surface. These can be sampled almost arbitrarily, though the noise statistics will vary depending on the sampling strategy.
One noise realisation I find attractive can be had by randomly sampling a sphere. Normalizing a point in N-dimensional space by its 2-norm projects it to the surface of an N-dimensional unit sphere, so randomly sampling a sphere can be done very easily using randn() and vecnorm():
N = 5e3; % Number of nodes on our sphere
g=randn(3,N); % Random 3D points around origin
p=g./vecnorm(g); % Projected to unit sphere
The next step is to find each point's "neighbors." The first step is to find the convex hull. Since each point is on the sphere, the convex hull will include each point as a vertex in the triangulation:
k=convhull(p');
In the above, k is an N x 3 set of indices where each row represents a unique triangle formed by a triplicate of points on the sphere surface. The vertices of the full set of triangles containing a point describe the list of neighbors to that point.
What we want now is a large, sparse symmetric matrix where the indices of the columns & rows represent the indices of the points on the sphere and the nth row (and/or column) contains non-zero entries at the indices corresponding to the neighbors of the nth point.
How to do this? You could set up a tiresome nested for-loop searching for all rows (triangles) in k that contain some index n, or you could directly index via:
c=@(x)sparse(k(:,x)*[1,1,1],k,1,N,N);
t=c(1)|c(2)|c(3);
The result is the desired sparse connectivity matrix: a matrix with non-zero entries defining neighboring points.
So how do we create a textured sphere with this connectivity matrix? We will use it to form a set of equations that, when combined with the concept of "regularization," will allow us to determine the properties of the randomness on the surface. Our regularizer will penalize the difference of the radial distance of a point and the average of its neighbors. To do this we replace the main diagonal with the negative of the sum of the off-diagonal components so that the rows and columns are zero-mean. This can be done via:
w=spdiags(-sum(t,2)+1,0,double(t));
Now we invoke a bit of linear algebra. Pretend x is an N-length vector representing the radial distance of each point on our sphere with the noise realization we desire. Y will be an N-length vector of "observations" we are going to generate randomly, in this case using a uniform distribution (because it has a bias and we want a non-zero average radius, but you can play around with different distributions than uniform to get different effects):
Y=rand(N,1);
and A is going to be our "transformation" matrix mapping x to our noisy observations:
Ax = Y
In this case both x and Y are N length vectors and A is just the identity matrix:
A = speye(N);
Y, however, doesn't create the noise realization we want. So in the equation above, when solving for x we are going to introduce a regularizer which is going to penalize unwanted behavior of x by some amount. That behavior is defined by the point-neighbor radial differences represented in matrix w. Our estimate of x can then be found using one of my favorite Matlab assets, the "\" operator:
smoothness = 10; % Smoothness penalty: higher is smoother
x = (A+smoothness*w'*w)\Y; % Solving for radii
The vector x now contains the radii with the specified noise realization for the sphere which can be created simply by multiplying x by p and plotting using trisurf:
p2 = p.*x';
trisurf(k,p2(1,:),p2(2,:),p2(3,:),'FaceC', 'w', 'EdgeC', 'none','AmbientS',0,'DiffuseS',0.6,'SpecularS',1);
light;
set(gca, 'color', 'k');
axis equal
The following images show what happens as you change the smoothness parameter using values [.1, 1, 10, 100] (left to right):
Now you know a couple ways to make a textured sphere: that's the starting point for having a lot of fun with basic procedural planet, moon, or astroid generation! Here's some examples of things you can create based on these general ideas:
Hans Scharler
Hans Scharler
Last activity on 19 Apr 2024 at 23:11

I am often talking to new MATLAB users. I have put together one script. If you know how this script works, why, and what each line means, you will be well on your way on your MATLAB learning journey.
% Clear existing variables and close figures
clear;
close all;
% Print to the Command Window
disp('Hello, welcome to MATLAB!');
% Create a simple vector and matrix
vector = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
matrix = [1, 2, 3; 4, 5, 6; 7, 8, 9];
% Display the created vector and matrix
disp('Created vector:');
disp(vector);
disp('Created matrix:');
disp(matrix);
% Perform element-wise multiplication
result = vector .* 2;
% Display the result of the operation
disp('Result of element-wise multiplication of the vector by 2:');
disp(result);
% Create plot
x = 0:0.1:2*pi; % Generate values from 0 to 2*pi
y = sin(x); % Calculate the sine of these values
% Plotting
figure; % Create a new figure window
plot(x, y); % Plot x vs. y
title('Simple Plot of sin(x)'); % Give the plot a title
xlabel('x'); % Label the x-axis
ylabel('sin(x)'); % Label the y-axis
grid on; % Turn on the grid
disp('This is the end of the script. Explore MATLAB further to learn more!');
Vonny Groose
Vonny Groose
Last activity on 19 Apr 2024 at 23:03

Mari is helping Dad work.
Today, he got dressed for work to design some new dog toy-making algorithms. #nationalpetday
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David
David
Last activity on 18 Apr 2024 at 14:13

How long until the 'dumbest' models are smarter than your average person? Thanks for sharing this article @Adam Danz
We are thrilled to announce the launch of a brand-new area within the MATLAB Central community – 'Discussions'. This exciting addition is designed to foster a stronger and more connected community.
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Hello MathWorks Community,

I am excited to announce that I am currently working on a book project centered around Matrix Algebra, specifically designed for MATLAB users. This book aims to cater to undergraduate students in engineering, where Matrix Algebra serves as a foundational element.

Matrix Algebra is not only pivotal in understanding complex engineering concepts but also in applying these principles effectively in various technological solutions. MATLAB, renowned for its powerful computational capabilities, is an excellent tool to explore and implement these concepts, making it a perfect companion for this book.

As I embark on this journey to create a resource that bridges theoretical matrix algebra with practical MATLAB applications, I am looking for one or two knowledgeable individuals who have a firm grasp of both subjects. If you have experience in teaching or applying matrix algebra in engineering contexts and are familiar with MATLAB, your contribution could be invaluable.

Collaborators will help in shaping the content to ensure it is educational, engaging, and technically robust, making complex concepts accessible and applicable for students.

If you are interested in contributing to this project or know someone who might be, please reach out to discuss how we can work together to make this book a valuable resource for engineering students.

Thank you and looking forward to your participation!

eye(3) - diag(ones(1,3))
11%
0 ./ ones(3)
9%
cos(repmat(pi/2, [3,3]))
16%
zeros(3)
20%
A(3, 3) = 0
32%
mtimes([1;1;0], [0,0,0])
12%
3009 votes
Chen Lin
Chen Lin
Last activity on 12 Apr 2024 at 18:28

What's the weather like in your place?
I created an ellipse visualizer in #MATLAB using App Designer! To read more about it, and how it ties to the recent total solar eclipse, check out my latest blog post:
Github Repo of the app (you can open it on MATLAB Online!):
Introduction
Comma-separated lists are really very simple. You use them all the time. Here is one:
a,b,c,d
That is a comma-separated list containing four variables, the variables a, b, c, and d. Every time you write a list separated by commas then you are writing a comma-separated list. Most commonly you would write a comma-separated list as inputs when calling a function:
fun(a,b,c,d)
or as arguments to the concatenation operator or cell construction operator:
[a,b,c,d]
{a,b,c,d}
or as function outputs:
[a,b,c,d] = fun();
It is very important to understand that in general a comma-separated list is NOT one variable (but it could be). However, sometimes it is useful to create a comma-separated list from one variable (or define one variable from a comma-separated list), and MATLAB has several ways of doing this from various container array types:
1) from a field of a structure array using dot-indexing:
struct_array.field % all elements
struct_array(idx).field % selected elements
2) from a cell array using curly-braces:
cell_array{:} % all elements
cell_array{idx} % selected elements
3) from a string array using curly-braces:
string_array{:} % all elements
string_array{idx} % selected elements
Note that in all cases, the comma-separated list consists of the content of the container array, not subsets (or "slices") of the container array itself (use parentheses to "slice" any array). In other words, they will be equivalent to writing this comma-separated list of the container array content:
content1, content2, content3, .. , contentN
and will return as many content arrays as the original container array has elements (or that you select using indexing, in the requested order). A comma-separated list of one element is just one array, but in general there can be any number of separate arrays in the comma-separated list (zero, one, two, three, four, or more). Here is an example showing that a comma-separated list generated from the content of a cell array is the same as a comma-separated list written explicitly:
>> C = {1,0,Inf};
>> C{:}
ans =
1
ans =
0
ans =
Inf
>> 1,0,Inf
ans =
1
ans =
0
ans =
Inf
How to Use Comma-Separated Lists
Function Inputs: Remember that every time you call a function with multiple input arguments you are using a comma-separated list:
fun(a,b,c,d)
and this is exactly why they are useful: because you can specify the arguments for a function or operator without knowing anything about the arguments (even how many there are). Using the example cell array from above:
>> vertcat(C{:})
ans =
1
0
Inf
which, as we should know by now, is exactly equivalent to writing the same comma-separated list directly into the function call:
>> vertcat(1,0,Inf)
ans =
1
0
Inf
How can we use this? Commonly these are used to generate vectors of values from a structure or cell array, e.g. to concatenate the filenames which are in the output structure of dir:
S = dir(..);
F = {S.name}
which is simply equivalent to
F = {S(1).name, S(2).name, S(3).name, .. , S(end).name}
Or, consider a function with multiple optional input arguments:
opt = {'HeaderLines',2, 'Delimiter',',', 'CollectOutputs',true);
fid = fopen(..);
C = textscan(fid,'%f%f',opt{:});
fclose(fid);
Note how we can pass the optional arguments as a comma-separated list. Remember how a comma-separated list is equivalent to writing var1,var2,var3,..., then the above example is really just this:
C = textscan(fid,'%f%f', 'HeaderLines',2, 'Delimiter',',', 'CollectOutputs',true)
with the added advantage that we can specify all of the optional arguments elsewhere and handle them as one cell array (e.g. as a function input, or at the top of the file). Or we could select which options we want simply by using indexing on that cell array. Note that varargin and varargout can also be useful here.
Function Outputs: In much the same way that the input arguments can be specified, so can an arbitrary number of output arguments. This is commonly used for functions which return a variable number of output arguments, specifically ind2sub and gradient and ndgrid. For example we can easily get all outputs of ndgrid, for any number of inputs (in this example three inputs and three outputs, determined by the number of elements in the cell array):
C = {1:3,4:7,8:9};
[C{:}] = ndgrid(C{:});
which is thus equivalent to:
[C{1},C{2},C{3}] = ndgrid(C{1},C{2},C{3});
Further Topics:
MATLAB documentation:
Click on these links to jump to relevant comments below:
Dynamic Indexing (indexing into arrays with arbitrary numbers of dimensions)
Nested Structures (why you get an error trying to index into a comma-separated list)
Summary
Just remember that in general a comma-separated list is not one variable (although they can be), and that they are exactly what they say: a list (of arrays) separated with commas. You use them all the time without even realizing it, every time you write this:
fun(a,b,c,d)
The latest release is pretty much upon us. Official annoucements will be coming soon and the eagle-eyed among you will have started to notice some things shifting around on the MathWorks website as we ready for this.
The pre-release has been available for a while. Maybe you've played with it? I have...I've even been quietly using it to write some of my latest blog posts...and I have several queued up for publication after MathWorks officially drops the release.
At the time of writing, this page points to the pre-release highlights. Prerelease Release Highlights - MATLAB & Simulink (mathworks.com)
What excites you about this release? why?
Transforming my furry friend into a grayscale masterpiece with MATLAB! 🐾 #MATLABPetsDay
Hans Scharler
Hans Scharler
Last activity on 11 Apr 2024 at 16:01

This is Stella while waiting to see if the code works...
The beautiful and elegant chord diagrams were all created using MATLAB?
Indeed, they were all generated using the chord diagram plotting toolkit that I developed myself:
You can download these toolkits from the provided links.
The reason for writing this article is that many people have started using the chord diagram plotting toolkit that I developed. However, some users are unsure about customizing certain styles. As the developer, I have a good understanding of the implementation principles of the toolkit and can apply it flexibly. This has sparked the idea of challenging myself to create various styles of chord diagrams. Currently, the existing code is quite lengthy. In the future, I may integrate some of this code into the toolkit, enabling users to achieve the effects of many lines of code with just a few lines.
Without further ado, let's see the extent to which this MATLAB toolkit can currently perform.
demo 1
rng(2)
dataMat = randi([0,5], [11,5]);
dataMat(1:6,1) = 0;
dataMat([11,7],1) = [45,25];
dataMat([1,4,5,7],2) = [20,20,30,30];
dataMat(:,3) = 0;
dataMat(6,3) = 45;
dataMat(1:5,4) = 0;
dataMat([6,7],4) = [25,25];
dataMat([5,6,9],5) = [25,25,25];
colName = {'Fly', 'Beetle', 'Leaf', 'Soil', 'Waxberry'};
rowName = {'Bartomella', 'Bradyrhizobium', 'Dysgomonas', 'Enterococcus',...
'Lactococcus', 'norank', 'others', 'Pseudomonas', 'uncultured',...
'Vibrionimonas', 'Wolbachia'};
figure('Units','normalized', 'Position',[.02,.05,.6,.85])
CC = chordChart(dataMat, 'rowName',rowName, 'colName',colName, 'Sep',1/80);
CC = CC.draw();
% 修改上方方块颜色(Modify the color of the blocks above)
CListT = [0.7765 0.8118 0.5216; 0.4431 0.4706 0.3843; 0.5804 0.2275 0.4549;
0.4471 0.4039 0.6745; 0.0157 0 0 ];
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
CC.setSquareT_N(i, 'FaceColor',CListT(i,:))
end
% 修改下方方块颜色(Modify the color of the blocks below)
CListF = [0.5843 0.6863 0.7843; 0.1098 0.1647 0.3255; 0.0902 0.1608 0.5373;
0.6314 0.7961 0.2118; 0.0392 0.2078 0.1059; 0.0157 0 0 ;
0.8549 0.9294 0.8745; 0.3882 0.3255 0.4078; 0.5020 0.7216 0.3843;
0.0902 0.1843 0.1804; 0.8196 0.2314 0.0706];
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
CC.setSquareF_N(i, 'FaceColor',CListF(i,:))
end
% 修改弦颜色(Modify chord color)
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
for j = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
CC.setChordMN(i,j, 'FaceColor',CListT(j,:), 'FaceAlpha',.5)
end
end
CC.tickState('on')
CC.labelRotate('on')
CC.setFont('FontSize',17, 'FontName','Cambria')
% CC.labelRotate('off')
% textHdl = findobj(gca,'Tag','ChordLabel');
% for i = 1:length(textHdl)
% if textHdl(i).Position(2) < 0
% if abs(textHdl(i).Position(1)) > .7
% textHdl(i).Rotation = textHdl(i).Rotation + 45;
% textHdl(i).HorizontalAlignment = 'right';
% if textHdl(i).Rotation > 90
% textHdl(i).Rotation = textHdl(i).Rotation + 180;
% textHdl(i).HorizontalAlignment = 'left';
% end
% else
% textHdl(i).Rotation = textHdl(i).Rotation + 10;
% textHdl(i).HorizontalAlignment = 'right';
% end
% end
% end
demo 2
rng(3)
dataMat = randi([1,15], [7,22]);
dataMat(dataMat < 11) = 0;
dataMat(1, sum(dataMat, 1) == 0) = 15;
colName = {'A2M', 'FGA', 'FGB', 'FGG', 'F11', 'KLKB1', 'SERPINE1', 'VWF',...
'THBD', 'TFPI', 'PLAT', 'SERPINA5', 'SERPIND1', 'F2', 'PLG', 'F12',...
'SERPINC1', 'SERPINA1', 'PROS1', 'SERPINF2', 'F13A1', 'PROC'};
rowName = {'Lung', 'Spleen', 'Liver', 'Heart',...
'Renal cortex', 'Renal medulla', 'Thyroid'};
figure('Units','normalized', 'Position',[.02,.05,.6,.85])
CC = chordChart(dataMat, 'rowName',rowName, 'colName',colName, 'Sep',1/80, 'LRadius',1.21);
CC = CC.draw();
CC.labelRotate('on')
% 单独设置每一个弦末端方块(Set individual end blocks for each chord)
% Use obj.setEachSquareF_Prop
% or obj.setEachSquareT_Prop
% F means from (blocks below)
% T means to (blocks above)
CListT = [173,70,65; 79,135,136]./255;
% Upregulated:1 | Downregulated:2
Regulated = rand([7, 22]);
Regulated = (Regulated < .8) + 1;
for i = 1:size(Regulated, 1)
for j = 1:size(Regulated, 2)
CC.setEachSquareT_Prop(i, j, 'FaceColor', CListT(Regulated(i,j),:))
end
end
% 绘制图例(Draw legend)
H1 = fill([0,1,0] + 100, [1,0,1] + 100, CListT(1,:), 'EdgeColor','none');
H2 = fill([0,1,0] + 100, [1,0,1] + 100, CListT(2,:), 'EdgeColor','none');
lgdHdl = legend([H1,H2], {'Upregulated','Downregulated'}, 'AutoUpdate','off', 'Location','best');
lgdHdl.ItemTokenSize = [12,12];
lgdHdl.Box = 'off';
lgdHdl.FontSize = 13;
% 修改下方方块颜色(Modify the color of the blocks below)
CListF = [128,108,171; 222,208,161; 180,196,229; 209,150,146; 175,201,166;
134,156,118; 175,175,173]./255;
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
CC.setSquareF_N(i, 'FaceColor',CListF(i,:))
end
% 修改弦颜色(Modify chord color)
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
for j = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
CC.setChordMN(i,j, 'FaceColor',CListF(i,:), 'FaceAlpha',.45)
end
end
demo 3
dataMat = rand([15,15]);
dataMat(dataMat > .15) = 0;
CList = [ 75,146,241; 252,180, 65; 224, 64, 10; 5,100,146; 191,191,191;
26, 59,105; 255,227,130; 18,156,221; 202,107, 75; 0, 92,219;
243,210,136; 80, 99,129; 241,185,168; 224,131, 10; 120,147,190]./255;
figure('Units','normalized', 'Position',[.02,.05,.6,.85])
BCC = biChordChart(dataMat, 'Arrow','on', 'CData',CList);
BCC = BCC.draw();
% 添加刻度
BCC.tickState('on')
% 修改字体,字号及颜色
BCC.setFont('FontName','Cambria', 'FontSize',17, 'Color',[0,0,.8])
demo 4
rng(5)
dataMat = randi([1,20], [5,5]);
dataMat(1,1) = 110;
dataMat(2,2) = 40;
dataMat(3,3) = 50;
dataMat(5,5) = 50;
CList1 = [164,190,158; 216,213,153; 177,192,208; 238,238,227; 249,217,153]./255;
CList2 = [247,204,138; 128,187,185; 245,135,124; 140,199,197; 252,223,164]./255;
CList = CList2;
NameList={'CHORD','CHART','MADE','BY','SLANDARER'};
figure('Units','normalized', 'Position',[.02,.05,.6,.85])
BCC = biChordChart(dataMat, 'Arrow','on', 'CData',CList, 'Sep',1/30, 'Label',NameList, 'LRadius',1.33);
BCC = BCC.draw();
% 添加刻度
BCC.tickState('on')
% 修改弦颜色(Modify chord color)
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
for j = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
if dataMat(i,j) > 0
BCC.setChordMN(i,j, 'FaceAlpha',.7, 'EdgeColor',CList(i,:)./1.1)
end
end
end
% 修改方块颜色(Modify the color of the blocks)
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
BCC.setSquareN(i, 'EdgeColor',CList(i,:)./1.7)
end
% 修改字体,字号及颜色
BCC.setFont('FontName','Cambria', 'FontSize',17)
BCC.tickLabelState('on')
BCC.setTickFont('FontName','Cambria', 'FontSize',9)
demo 5
dataMat=randi([1,20], [14,3]);
dataMat(11:14,1) = 0;
dataMat(6:10,2) = 0;
dataMat(1:5,3) = 0;
colName = compose('C%d', 1:3);
rowName = [compose('A%d', 1:7), compose('B%d', 7:-1:1)];
figure('Units','normalized', 'Position',[.02,.05,.6,.85])
CC = chordChart(dataMat, 'rowName',rowName, 'colName',colName, 'Sep',1/80);
CC = CC.draw();
% 修改上方方块颜色(Modify the color of the blocks above)
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
CC.setSquareT_N(i, 'FaceColor',[190,190,190]./255)
end
% 修改下方方块颜色(Modify the color of the blocks below)
CListF=[255,244,138; 253,220,117; 254,179, 78; 253,190, 61;
252, 78, 41; 228, 26, 26; 178, 0, 36; 4, 84,119;
1,113,137; 21,150,155; 67,176,173; 68,173,158;
123,204,163; 184,229,162]./255;
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
CC.setSquareF_N(i, 'FaceColor',CListF(i,:))
end
% 修改弦颜色(Modify chord color)
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
for j = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
CC.setChordMN(i,j, 'FaceColor',CListF(i,:), 'FaceAlpha',.5)
end
end
CC.tickState('on')
CC.tickLabelState('on')
demo 6
rng(2)
dataMat = randi([0,40], [20,4]);
dataMat(rand([20,4]) < .2) = 0;
dataMat(1,3) = 500;
dataMat(20,1:4) = [140; 150; 80; 90];
colName = compose('T%d', 1:4);
rowName = compose('SL%d', 1:20);
figure('Units','normalized', 'Position',[.02,.05,.6,.85])
CC = chordChart(dataMat, 'rowName',rowName, 'colName',colName, 'Sep',1/80, 'LRadius',1.23);
CC = CC.draw();
% 修改上方方块颜色(Modify the color of the blocks above)
CListT = [0.62,0.49,0.27; 0.28,0.57,0.76
0.25,0.53,0.30; 0.86,0.48,0.34];
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
CC.setSquareT_N(i, 'FaceColor',CListT(i,:))
end
% 修改下方方块颜色(Modify the color of the blocks below)
CListF = [0.94,0.84,0.60; 0.16,0.50,0.67; 0.92,0.62,0.49;
0.48,0.44,0.60; 0.48,0.44,0.60; 0.71,0.79,0.73;
0.96,0.98,0.98; 0.51,0.82,0.95; 0.98,0.70,0.82;
0.97,0.85,0.84; 0.55,0.64,0.62; 0.94,0.93,0.60;
0.98,0.90,0.85; 0.72,0.84,0.81; 0.85,0.45,0.49;
0.76,0.76,0.84; 0.59,0.64,0.62; 0.62,0.14,0.15;
0.75,0.75,0.75; 1.00,1.00,1.00];
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
CC.setSquareF_N(i, 'FaceColor',CListF(i,:))
end
CC.setSquareF_N(size(dataMat, 1), 'EdgeColor','k', 'LineWidth',1)
% 修改弦颜色(Modify chord color)
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
for j = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
CC.setChordMN(i,j, 'FaceColor',CListT(j,:), 'FaceAlpha',.46)
end
end
CC.tickState('on')
CC.labelRotate('on')
CC.setFont('FontSize',17, 'FontName','Cambria')
demo 7
dataMat = randi([10,10000], [10,10]);
dataMat(6:10,:) = 0;
dataMat(:,1:5) = 0;
NameList = {'BOC', 'ICBC', 'ABC', 'BOCM', 'CCB', ...
'yama', 'nikoto', 'saki', 'koto', 'kawa'};
CList = [0.63,0.75,0.88
0.67,0.84,0.75
0.85,0.78,0.88
1.00,0.92,0.93
0.92,0.63,0.64
0.57,0.67,0.75
1.00,0.65,0.44
0.72,0.73,0.40
0.65,0.57,0.58
0.92,0.94,0.96];
figure('Units','normalized', 'Position',[.02,.05,.6,.85])
BCC = biChordChart(dataMat, 'Arrow','on', 'CData',CList, 'Label',NameList);
BCC = BCC.draw();
% 修改弦颜色(Modify chord color)
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
for j = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
if dataMat(i,j) > 0
BCC.setChordMN(i,j, 'FaceAlpha',.85, 'EdgeColor',CList(i,:)./1.5, 'LineWidth',.8)
end
end
end
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
BCC.setSquareN(i, 'EdgeColor',CList(i,:)./1.5, 'LineWidth',1)
end
% 添加刻度、修改字体
BCC.tickState('on')
BCC.setFont('FontName','Cambria', 'FontSize',17)
demo 8
dataMat = rand([11,4]);
dataMat = round(10.*dataMat.*((11:-1:1).'+1))./10;
colName = {'A','B','C','D'};
rowName = {'Acidobacteriota', 'Actinobacteriota', 'Proteobacteria', ...
'Chloroflexi', 'Bacteroidota', 'Firmicutes', 'Gemmatimonadota', ...
'Verrucomicrobiota', 'Patescibacteria', 'Planctomyetota', 'Others'};
figure('Units','normalized', 'Position',[.02,.05,.8,.85])
CC = chordChart(dataMat, 'colName',colName, 'Sep',1/80, 'SSqRatio',30/100);% -30/100
CC = CC.draw();
% 修改上方方块颜色(Modify the color of the blocks above)
CListT = [0.93,0.60,0.62
0.55,0.80,0.99
0.95,0.82,0.18
1.00,0.81,0.91];
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
CC.setSquareT_N(i, 'FaceColor',CListT(i,:))
end
% 修改下方方块颜色(Modify the color of the blocks below)
CListF = [0.75,0.73,0.86
0.56,0.83,0.78
0.00,0.60,0.20
1.00,0.49,0.02
0.78,0.77,0.95
0.59,0.24,0.36
0.98,0.51,0.45
0.96,0.55,0.75
0.47,0.71,0.84
0.65,0.35,0.16
0.40,0.00,0.64];
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
CC.setSquareF_N(i, 'FaceColor',CListF(i,:))
end
% 修改弦颜色(Modify chord color)
CListC = [0.55,0.83,0.76
0.75,0.73,0.86
0.00,0.60,0.19
1.00,0.51,0.04];
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
for j = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
CC.setChordMN(i,j, 'FaceColor',CListC(j,:), 'FaceAlpha',.4)
end
end
% 单独设置每一个弦末端方块(Set individual end blocks for each chord)
% Use obj.setEachSquareF_Prop
% or obj.setEachSquareT_Prop
% F means from (blocks below)
% T means to (blocks above)
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
for j = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
CC.setEachSquareT_Prop(i,j, 'FaceColor', CListF(i,:))
end
end
% 添加刻度
CC.tickState('on')
% 修改字体,字号及颜色
CC.setFont('FontName','Cambria', 'FontSize',17)
% 隐藏下方标签
textHdl = findobj(gca, 'Tag','ChordLabel');
for i = 1:length(textHdl)
if textHdl(i).Position(2) < 0
set(textHdl(i), 'Visible','off')
end
end
% 绘制图例(Draw legend)
scatterHdl = scatter(10.*ones(size(dataMat,1)),10.*ones(size(dataMat,1)), ...
55, 'filled');
for i = 1:length(scatterHdl)
scatterHdl(i).CData = CListF(i,:);
end
lgdHdl = legend(scatterHdl, rowName, 'Location','best', 'FontSize',16, 'FontName','Cambria', 'Box','off');
set(lgdHdl, 'Position',[.7482,.3577,.1658,.3254])
demo 9
dataMat = randi([0,10], [5,5]);
CList1 = [0.70,0.59,0.67
0.62,0.70,0.62
0.81,0.75,0.62
0.80,0.62,0.56
0.62,0.65,0.65];
CList2 = [0.02,0.02,0.02
0.59,0.26,0.33
0.38,0.49,0.38
0.03,0.05,0.03
0.29,0.28,0.32];
CList = CList2;
NameList={'CHORD','CHART','MADE','BY','SLANDARER'};
figure('Units','normalized', 'Position',[.02,.05,.6,.85])
BCC = biChordChart(dataMat, 'Arrow','on', 'CData',CList, 'Sep',1/30, 'Label',NameList, 'LRadius',1.33);
BCC = BCC.draw();
% 修改弦颜色(Modify chord color)
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
for j = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
BCC.setChordMN(i,j, 'FaceAlpha',.5)
end
end
% 修改方块颜色(Modify the color of the blocks)
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
BCC.setSquareN(i, 'EdgeColor',[0,0,0], 'LineWidth',5)
end
% 添加刻度
BCC.tickState('on')
% 修改字体,字号及颜色
BCC.setFont('FontSize',17, 'FontWeight','bold')
BCC.tickLabelState('on')
BCC.setTickFont('FontSize',9)
demo 10
rng(2)
dataMat = rand([14,5]) > .3;
colName = {'phosphorylation', 'vasculature development', 'blood vessel development', ...
'cell adhesion', 'plasma membrane'};
rowName = {'THY1', 'FGF2', 'MAP2K1', 'CDH2', 'HBEGF', 'CXCR4', 'ECSCR',...
'ACVRL1', 'RECK', 'PNPLA6', 'CDH5', 'AMOT', 'EFNB2', 'CAV1'};
figure('Units','normalized', 'Position',[.02,.05,.9,.85])
CC = chordChart(dataMat, 'colName',colName, 'rowName',rowName, 'Sep',1/80, 'LRadius',1.2);
CC = CC.draw();
% 修改上方方块颜色(Modify the color of the blocks above)
CListT1 = [0.5686 0.1961 0.2275
0.2275 0.2863 0.3765
0.8431 0.7882 0.4118
0.4275 0.4510 0.2706
0.3333 0.2706 0.2510];
CListT2 = [0.4941 0.5490 0.4118
0.9059 0.6510 0.3333
0.8980 0.6157 0.4980
0.8902 0.5137 0.4667
0.4275 0.2824 0.2784];
CListT3 = [0.4745 0.5843 0.7569
0.4824 0.5490 0.5843
0.6549 0.7216 0.6510
0.9412 0.9216 0.9059
0.9804 0.7608 0.6863];
CListT = CListT3;
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
CC.setSquareT_N(i, 'FaceColor',CListT(i,:), 'EdgeColor',[0,0,0])
end
% 修改弦颜色(Modify chord color)
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
for j = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
CC.setChordMN(i,j, 'FaceColor',CListT(j,:), 'FaceAlpha',.9, 'EdgeColor',[0,0,0])
end
end
% 修改下方方块颜色(Modify the color of the blocks below)
logFC = sort(rand(1,14))*6 - 3;
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
CC.setSquareF_N(i, 'CData',logFC(i), 'FaceColor','flat', 'EdgeColor',[0,0,0])
end
CMap = [ 0 0 1.0000; 0.0645 0.0645 1.0000; 0.1290 0.1290 1.0000; 0.1935 0.1935 1.0000
0.2581 0.2581 1.0000; 0.3226 0.3226 1.0000; 0.3871 0.3871 1.0000; 0.4516 0.4516 1.0000
0.5161 0.5161 1.0000; 0.5806 0.5806 1.0000; 0.6452 0.6452 1.0000; 0.7097 0.7097 1.0000
0.7742 0.7742 1.0000; 0.8387 0.8387 1.0000; 0.9032 0.9032 1.0000; 0.9677 0.9677 1.0000
1.0000 0.9677 0.9677; 1.0000 0.9032 0.9032; 1.0000 0.8387 0.8387; 1.0000 0.7742 0.7742
1.0000 0.7097 0.7097; 1.0000 0.6452 0.6452; 1.0000 0.5806 0.5806; 1.0000 0.5161 0.5161
1.0000 0.4516 0.4516; 1.0000 0.3871 0.3871; 1.0000 0.3226 0.3226; 1.0000 0.2581 0.2581
1.0000 0.1935 0.1935; 1.0000 0.1290 0.1290; 1.0000 0.0645 0.0645; 1.0000 0 0];
colormap(CMap);
try clim([-3,3]),catch,end
try caxis([-3,3]),catch,end
CBHdl = colorbar();
CBHdl.Position = [0.74,0.25,0.02,0.2];
% =========================================================================
% 交换XY轴(Swap XY axis)
patchHdl = findobj(gca, 'Type','patch');
for i = 1:length(patchHdl)
tX = patchHdl(i).XData;
tY = patchHdl(i).YData;
patchHdl(i).XData = tY;
patchHdl(i).YData = - tX;
end
txtHdl = findobj(gca, 'Type','text');
for i = 1:length(txtHdl)
txtHdl(i).Position([1,2]) = [1,-1].*txtHdl(i).Position([2,1]);
if txtHdl(i).Position(1) < 0
txtHdl(i).HorizontalAlignment = 'right';
else
txtHdl(i).HorizontalAlignment = 'left';
end
end
lineHdl = findobj(gca, 'Type','line');
for i = 1:length(lineHdl)
tX = lineHdl(i).XData;
tY = lineHdl(i).YData;
lineHdl(i).XData = tY;
lineHdl(i).YData = - tX;
end
% =========================================================================
txtHdl = findobj(gca, 'Type','text');
for i = 1:length(txtHdl)
if txtHdl(i).Position(1) > 0
txtHdl(i).Visible = 'off';
end
end
text(1.25,-.15, 'LogFC', 'FontSize',16)
text(1.25,1, 'Terms', 'FontSize',16)
patchHdl = [];
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
patchHdl(i) = fill([10,11,12],[10,13,13], CListT(i,:), 'EdgeColor',[0,0,0]);
end
lgdHdl = legend(patchHdl, colName, 'Location','best', 'FontSize',14, 'FontName','Cambria', 'Box','off');
lgdHdl.Position = [.735,.53,.167,.27];
lgdHdl.ItemTokenSize = [18,8];
demo 11
rng(2)
dataMat = rand([12,12]);
dataMat(dataMat < .85) = 0;
dataMat(7,:) = 1.*(rand(1,12)+.1);
dataMat(11,:) = .6.*(rand(1,12)+.1);
dataMat(12,:) = [2.*(rand(1,10)+.1), 0, 0];
CList = [repmat([49,49,49],[10,1]); 235,28,34; 19,146,241]./255;
figure('Units','normalized', 'Position',[.02,.05,.6,.85])
BCC = biChordChart(dataMat, 'Arrow','off', 'CData',CList);
BCC = BCC.draw();
% 添加刻度
BCC.tickState('on')
% 修改字体,字号及颜色
BCC.setFont('FontName','Cambria', 'FontSize',17)
% 修改弦颜色(Modify chord color)
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
for j = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
if dataMat(i,j) > 0
BCC.setChordMN(i,j, 'FaceAlpha',.78, 'EdgeColor',[0,0,0])
end
end
end
% 修改方块颜色(Modify the color of the blocks)
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
BCC.setSquareN(i, 'EdgeColor',[0,0,0], 'LineWidth',2)
end
demo 12
dataMat = rand([9,9]);
dataMat(dataMat > .7) = 0;
dataMat(eye(9) == 1) = (rand([1,9])+.2).*3;
CList = [0.85,0.23,0.24
0.96,0.39,0.18
0.98,0.63,0.22
0.99,0.80,0.26
0.70,0.76,0.21
0.24,0.74,0.71
0.27,0.65,0.84
0.09,0.37,0.80
0.64,0.40,0.84];
figure('Units','normalized', 'Position',[.02,.05,.6,.85])
BCC = biChordChart(dataMat, 'Arrow','on', 'CData',CList);
BCC = BCC.draw();
% 添加刻度、刻度标签
BCC.tickState('on')
% 修改字体,字号及颜色
BCC.setFont('FontName','Cambria', 'FontSize',17)
% 修改弦颜色(Modify chord color)
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
for j = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
if dataMat(i,j) > 0
BCC.setChordMN(i,j, 'FaceAlpha',.7)
end
end
end
demo 13
rng(2)
dataMat = randi([1,40], [7,4]);
dataMat(rand([7,4]) < .1) = 0;
colName = compose('MATLAB%d', 1:4);
rowName = compose('SL%d', 1:7);
figure('Units','normalized', 'Position',[.02,.05,.7,.85])
CC = chordChart(dataMat, 'rowName',rowName, 'colName',colName, 'Sep',1/80, 'LRadius',1.32);
CC = CC.draw();
% 修改上方方块颜色(Modify the color of the blocks above)
CListT = [0.49,0.64,0.53
0.75,0.39,0.35
0.80,0.74,0.42
0.40,0.55,0.66];
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
CC.setSquareT_N(i, 'FaceColor',CListT(i,:))
end
% 修改下方方块颜色(Modify the color of the blocks below)
CListF = [0.91,0.91,0.97
0.62,0.95,0.66
0.91,0.61,0.20
0.54,0.45,0.82
0.99,0.76,0.81
0.91,0.85,0.83
0.53,0.42,0.43];
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
CC.setSquareF_N(i, 'FaceColor',CListF(i,:))
end
% 修改弦颜色(Modify chord color)
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
for j = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
CC.setChordMN(i,j, 'FaceColor',CListT(j,:), 'FaceAlpha',.46)
end
end
CC.tickState('on')
CC.tickLabelState('on')
CC.setFont('FontSize',17, 'FontName','Cambria')
CC.setTickFont('FontSize',8, 'FontName','Cambria')
% 绘制图例(Draw legend)
scatterHdl = scatter(10.*ones(size(dataMat,1)),10.*ones(size(dataMat,1)), ...
55, 'filled');
for i = 1:length(scatterHdl)
scatterHdl(i).CData = CListF(i,:);
end
lgdHdl = legend(scatterHdl, rowName, 'Location','best', 'FontSize',16, 'FontName','Cambria', 'Box','off');
set(lgdHdl, 'Position',[.77,.38,.1658,.27])
demo 14
rng(6)
dataMat = randi([1,20], [8,8]);
dataMat(dataMat > 5) = 0;
dataMat(1,:) = randi([1,15], [1,8]);
dataMat(1,8) = 40;
dataMat(8,8) = 60;
dataMat = dataMat./sum(sum(dataMat));
CList = [0.33,0.53,0.86
0.94,0.50,0.42
0.92,0.58,0.30
0.59,0.47,0.45
0.37,0.76,0.82
0.82,0.68,0.29
0.75,0.62,0.87
0.43,0.69,0.57];
NameList={'CHORD', 'CHART', 'AND', 'BICHORD',...
'CHART', 'MADE', 'BY', 'SLANDARER'};
figure('Units','normalized', 'Position',[.02,.05,.6,.85])
BCC = biChordChart(dataMat, 'Arrow','on', 'CData',CList, 'Sep',1/12, 'Label',NameList, 'LRadius',1.33);
BCC = BCC.draw();
% 添加刻度
BCC.tickState('on')
% 修改弦颜色(Modify chord color)
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
for j = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
if dataMat(i,j) > 0
BCC.setChordMN(i,j, 'FaceAlpha',.7, 'EdgeColor',CList(i,:)./1.1)
end
end
end
% 修改方块颜色(Modify the color of the blocks)
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
BCC.setSquareN(i, 'EdgeColor',CList(i,:)./1.7)
end
% 修改字体,字号及颜色
BCC.setFont('FontName','Cambria', 'FontSize',17)
BCC.tickLabelState('on')
BCC.setTickFont('FontName','Cambria', 'FontSize',9)
% 调整数值字符串格式
% Adjust numeric string format
BCC.setTickLabelFormat(@(x)[num2str(round(x*100)),'%'])
demo 15
CList = [0.81,0.72,0.83
0.69,0.82,0.89
0.17,0.44,0.64
0.70,0.85,0.55
0.03,0.57,0.13
0.97,0.67,0.64
0.84,0.09,0.12
1.00,0.80,0.46
0.98,0.52,0.01
];
figure('Units','normalized', 'Position',[.02,.05,.53,.85], 'Color',[1,1,1])
% =========================================================================
ax1 = axes('Parent',gcf, 'Position',[0,1/2,1/2,1/2]);
dataMat = rand([9,9]);
dataMat(dataMat > .4) = 0;
BCC = biChordChart(dataMat, 'Arrow','on', 'CData',CList);
BCC = BCC.draw();
BCC.tickState('on')
BCC.setFont('Visible','off')
% 修改弦颜色(Modify chord color)
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
for j = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
if dataMat(i,j) > 0
BCC.setChordMN(i,j, 'FaceAlpha',.6)
end
end
end
text(-1.2,1.2, 'a', 'FontName','Times New Roman', 'FontSize',35)
% =========================================================================
ax2 = axes('Parent',gcf, 'Position',[1/2,1/2,1/2,1/2]);
dataMat = rand([9,9]);
dataMat(dataMat > .4) = 0;
dataMat = dataMat.*(1:9);
BCC = biChordChart(dataMat, 'Arrow','on', 'CData',CList);
BCC = BCC.draw();
BCC.tickState('on')
BCC.setFont('Visible','off')
% 修改弦颜色(Modify chord color)
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
for j = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
if dataMat(i,j) > 0
BCC.setChordMN(i,j, 'FaceAlpha',.6)
end
end
end
text(-1.2,1.2, 'b', 'FontName','Times New Roman', 'FontSize',35)
% =========================================================================
ax3 = axes('Parent',gcf, 'Position',[0,0,1/2,1/2]);
dataMat = rand([9,9]);
dataMat(dataMat > .4) = 0;
dataMat = dataMat.*(1:9).';
BCC = biChordChart(dataMat, 'Arrow','on', 'CData',CList);
BCC = BCC.draw();
BCC.tickState('on')
BCC.setFont('Visible','off')
% 修改弦颜色(Modify chord color)
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
for j = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
if dataMat(i,j) > 0
BCC.setChordMN(i,j, 'FaceAlpha',.6)
end
end
end
text(-1.2,1.2, 'c', 'FontName','Times New Roman', 'FontSize',35)
% =========================================================================
ax4 = axes('Parent',gcf, 'Position',[1/2,0,1/2,1/2]);
ax4.XColor = 'none'; ax4.YColor = 'none';
ax4.XLim = [-1,1]; ax4.YLim = [-1,1];
hold on
NameList = {'Food supply', 'Biodiversity', 'Water quality regulation', ...
'Air quality regulation', 'Erosion control', 'Carbon storage', ...
'Water retention', 'Recreation', 'Soil quality regulation'};
patchHdl = [];
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
patchHdl(i) = fill([10,11,12],[10,13,13], CList(i,:), 'EdgeColor',[0,0,0]);
end
lgdHdl = legend(patchHdl, NameList, 'Location','best', 'FontSize',14, 'FontName','Cambria', 'Box','off');
lgdHdl.Position = [.625,.11,.255,.27];
lgdHdl.ItemTokenSize = [18,8];
demo 16
dataMat = rand([15,15]);
dataMat(dataMat > .2) = 0;
CList = [ 75,146,241; 252,180, 65; 224, 64, 10; 5,100,146; 191,191,191;
26, 59,105; 255,227,130; 18,156,221; 202,107, 75; 0, 92,219;
243,210,136; 80, 99,129; 241,185,168; 224,131, 10; 120,147,190]./255;
CListC = [54,69,92]./255;
CList = CList.*.6 + CListC.*.4;
figure('Units','normalized', 'Position',[.02,.05,.6,.85])
BCC = biChordChart(dataMat, 'Arrow','on', 'CData',CList);
BCC = BCC.draw();
% 添加刻度
BCC.tickState('on')
% 修改字体,字号及颜色
BCC.setFont('FontName','Cambria', 'FontSize',17, 'Color',[0,0,0])
% 修改弦颜色(Modify chord color)
for i = 1:size(dataMat, 1)
for j = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
if dataMat(i,j) > 0
BCC.setChordMN(i,j, 'FaceColor',CListC ,'FaceAlpha',.07)
end
end
end
[~, N] = max(sum(dataMat > 0, 2));
for j = 1:size(dataMat, 2)
BCC.setChordMN(N,j, 'FaceColor',CList(N,:) ,'FaceAlpha',.6)
end
You need to download following tools:
Hey MATLAB Community! 🌟
As we continue to explore, learn, and innovate together, it's essential to take a moment to recognize the remarkable contributions that have sparked engaging discussions, solved perplexing problems, and shared insightful knowledge in the past two weeks. Let's dive into the highlights that have made our community even more vibrant and resourceful.

Interesting Questions

Burhan Burak brings up an intriguing issue faced when running certain code in MATLAB, seeking advice on how to refactor the code to eliminate a warning message. It's a great example of the practical challenges we often encounter
Jenni asks for guidance on improving linear models to fit data points more accurately. This question highlights the common hurdles in data analysis and model fitting, sparking a conversation on best practices and methodologies.

Popular Discussions

A thought-provoking question posed by goc3 that delves into the intricacies of MATLAB's logical operations. It's a great discussion starter that tests and expands our understanding of MATLAB's behavior.
Toshiaki Takeuchi shares an insightful visualization of the demand for MATLAB jobs across different regions, based on data from LinkedIn. This post not only provides a snapshot of the job market but also encourages members to discuss trends in MATLAB's use in the industry.

From the Blogs

Mike Croucher shares his excitement and insights on two long-awaited features finally making their way into MATLAB R2024a. His post reflects the passion and persistence of our community members in enhancing MATLAB's functionality.
In this informative post, Sivylla Paraskevopoulou offers practical tips for speeding up the training of deep learning models. It's a must-read for anyone looking to optimize their deep learning workflows.
A Heartfelt Thank You 🙏
To everyone who asked a question, started a discussion, or wrote a blog post: Thank you! Your contributions are what make our community a fountain of knowledge, inspiration, and innovation. Let's keep the momentum going and continue to support each other in our journey to explore the vast universe of MATLAB.
Happy Coding!
Note: If you haven't yet, make sure to check out these highlights and add your voice to our growing community. Your insights and experiences are what make us stronger.
Summary:
Dynamically accessing variable names can negatively impact the readability of your code and can cause it to run slower by preventing MATLAB from optimizing it as well as it could if you used alternate techniques. The most common alternative is to use simple and efficient indexing.
Explanation:
Sometimes beginners (and some self-taught professors) think it would be a good idea to dynamically create or access variable names, the variables are often named something like these:
  • matrix1, matrix2, matrix3, matrix4, ...
  • test_20kmh, test_50kmh, test_80kmh, ...
  • nameA, nameB, nameC, nameD,...
Good reasons why dynamic variable names should be avoided:
There are much better alternatives to accessing dynamic variable names:
Note that avoiding eval (and assignin, etc.) is not some esoteric MATLAB restriction, it also applies to many other programming languages as well:
MATLAB Documentation:
If you are not interested in reading the answers below then at least read MATLAB's own documentation on this topic Alternatives to the eval Function, which states "A frequent use of the eval function is to create sets of variables such as A1, A2, ..., An, but this approach does not use the array processing power of MATLAB and is not recommended. The preferred method is to store related data in a single array." Data in a single array can be accessed very efficiently using indexing.
Note that all of these problems and disadvantages also apply to functions load (without an output variable), assignin, evalin, and evalc, and the MATLAB documentation explicitly recommends to "Avoid functions such as eval, evalc, evalin, and feval(fname)".
The official MATLAB blogs explain why eval should be avoided, the better alternatives to eval, and clearly recommend against magically creating variables. Using eval comes out at position number one on this list of Top 10 MATLAB Code Practices That Make Me Cry. Experienced MATLAB users recommend avoiding using eval for trivial code, and have written extensively on this topic.